Sunday, April 26, 2015
English French German Spanish

Chris Harvie is a frequent contributor to newspapers, magazines, blogs and opinion forums such as openDemocracy, the Scottish Review of Books, Scots Independent, the Guardian’s Comment is Free and the Scottish Review.



The Breakers Yard of the Vanities (April 2010)

This article was first published on Bella Caledonia

The nose turned up on a barge from North Devon. The first instalment of the Gordon’s supercarrier Queen Elizabeth II. It wasn’t a very big nose, 400 tons, and almost certainly the event was staged for the media: a diplomatic pregnancy. The new 65,000 ton queen was to be glued together at Rosyth, in sight of the eyrie of the Premier at North Queensferry. In the Woody Allen film Sleeper a South American dictator is blown up and our man is asked to clone him from his only surviving bit: his nose. Thus would what the `Broonite Empire State’ be reborn. If this sounds weird, it is.

Read more...
 

The Sense of an Ending (February 2010)

This article was first published on Bella Caledonia

I have been grateful over the past few years for the hospitality of the Guardian’s ‘CommentisFree’, until its self-editing system was changed and new-style gatekeepers made it clear that freedom stopped around Watford Gap: not just my contributions but anything from too-far-north of London would not be welcomed. I wrote to other Guardian illuminati, but in Germany they say ‘Keine Antwort ist auch eine Antwort.’ – ‘No answer is also an answer.’ The terms of the New CiF dialogue were all too clear: liberty for vox metropolis, let the rest twitter in the wings.

Read more...
 

A Manchester of the Mind (December 2009)

E-mail Print PDF

This article was first published on openDemocracy.

J B Priestley wrote an essay about an Edwardian radical family living somewhere in the Pennines above Bradford, and connected with the Independent Labour Party. They kept liberty hall for hill-walkers and suffragettes, would-be poets and young people eager to get away from provincial bullies, the dark of the Nonconformist Sabbath and the awful Birling bourgeoisie Priestley would present in An Inspector Calls. They weren’t wealthy, but what they offered was multiplied by the folk they attracted.

Read more...
 

They're Playing Our Tune! (December 2009)

E-mail Print PDF

This article was first published in the Scottish Review.

When the Scots set off for the Delhi Commonwealth Games, they will pack in their sporrans an anthem chosen from among 'Flower of Scotland', 'Loch Lomond', 'Highland Cathedral' and 'Scotland the Brave'. This shortlist was the result of some unspecified form of consultation. Among scowling secondary schoolboys? Friday evening screamers in the Corinthian? VisitScotland in conclave with Donald Trump?

Read more...
 

The Lords of Humankind (December 2009)

E-mail Print PDF

This article was first published on openDemocracy.

Getting to Holyrood for an early division involves catching the Munro’s bus out of Melrose at 6.25: daunting on a cold winter morning. And nearly fruitless as the First Bus X95 to Edinburgh was just leaving Galashiels bus station (the 1986 Transport Act considers co-operation between companies, like seeing that services connect, ‘in restraint of trade’). Oblivious to this, the station shunter John Gibson ran out and stopped the Edinburgh bus, not the first service he’s rendered this commuter.

Read more...
 


Page 4 of 20
Home > Comment