Sunday, April 26, 2015
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Chris Harvie is a frequent contributor to newspapers, magazines, blogs and opinion forums such as openDemocracy, the Scottish Review of Books, Scots Independent, the Guardian’s Comment is Free and the Scottish Review.



A Scottish-Chinese Dream: Maglev Made Easy (January 2006)

This article was first published on openDemocracy

The rivalry between Edinburgh and Glasgow is almost as old as Scotland itself, and has varied with the centuries. Glasgow, before and after the Act of Union in 1707 - Daniel Defoe’s “beautifullest little city” – was the more genteel, clustered round the shallow Clyde, its bridge, and the magnificent Cathedral of St Mungo, while Edinburgh’s slums festered along the spine of the Royal Mile. By 1842 Georgian Edinburgh’s New Town squares and quadrants symbolised the Scottish Enlightenment, while the gridiron of Glasgow meant money from the Atlantic trade and engineering in the west end, and the slumland of tiny flats and uproarious bars spewed out to the Gorbals and east to Bridgeton. That year they connected the two cities by rail

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The German Solution? (September 2005)

This article was first published on openDemocracy

An economic model in crisis, a polity in chaos? No, says Christopher Harvie of Tübingen University – Germany has the resources to survive its troubles and confound its critics.

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Remembering Robin Cook (August 2005)

This article was first published on openDemocracy

The seriousness of Robin Cook's last phase – “conscience of the left” isn't putting it too high – wasn't totally in character. I saw much of him from about 1960, when he turned up at Edinburgh’s Royal High School, where his father was head of science, to an interview with him for a BBC programme I made on Scottish devolution in 1988.

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Looking Into Wales: A Nation Displayed (March 2002)

This article was first published on openDemocracy

“There are only two British news stories about Germany: new Nazis and old Nazis.” If the small Bavarian town of Landsberg is known at all it will be because Hitler wrote Mein Kampf there in 1923-4. But only a couple of hundred metres away from the prison there’s a prickly gothic tower, outside it the English and Bavarian flags, and the Red Dragon of Wales: the Herkomer Museum.

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